The bluest eye critical essays

One would never know that black people existed in this country. This section is interrupted by an italicized fragment representing the memories of Claudia MacTeer, the principal narrator of The Bluest Eye. In order to become the most beautiful person, Pecola must have blue eyes.

Others have considered the ways The Bluest Eye alludes to earlier black writings in order to express the traditionally silenced female point of view and uses conventional grotesque imagery as a vehicle for social protest.

The only way she can achieve these physical traits of dominant culture is by having blue eyes. All cultures teach their own standards of beauty and desirability through billboards, movies, books, dolls, and other products. Since then, however, The Bluest Eye has become a classroom staple, and scholarship on the novel has flourished from a number of perspectives.

This desire is especially strong in Pecola, who believes that blue eyes will make her beautiful and lovable. When Cholly rapes Pecola, it is a physical manifestation of the social, psychological, and personal violence that has raped Cholly for years. His name is "Breedlove," but he is incapable of loving; he is only able to perform the act of breeding.

The white standard of beauty is pervasive throughout this novel — because there is no black standard of beauty. The topic of child abuse, once a socially unmentionable subject, remained unaddressed far too long even though everyone knew about it.

The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison - Essay

As an adult, Claudia recalls incidents from late when she was nine years old living in Lorain, Ohio, with her poor but loving parents and her ten-year-old sister, Frieda. American society tells Pecola happy, white, middle-class families are better than hopeless, black, working-class families.

As her mental state slowly unravels, Pecola hopelessly longs to possess the conventional American standards of feminine beauty—namely, white skin, blonde hair, and blue eyes—as presented to her by the popular icons and traditions of white culture.

Inspired by a conversation Morrison once had with an elementary school classmate who wished for blue eyes, the novel poignantly shows the psychological devastation of a young black girl, Pecola Breedlove, who searches for love and acceptance in a world that denies and devalues people of her own race.

Morrison does not have to retell the story of three hundred years of black dominance by white culture for us to be aware of the history of American blacks, who have been victims in this tragedy. Pecola believes that if she had beautiful eyes, people would not be able to torment her mind or body.

The Bluest Eye

The theme in appearance in The Bluest Eye relates to racial discrimination against African-Americans being beautiful. The fact that Pecola desires blue eyes reveals that racism in society causes young African-American girls to envy whiteness, and to have low self-esteem.

As his surname implies, Cholly can only breed, not love, and his brutal act against his daughter produces a child who cannot live. Abandoned almost at birth, he is rescued by his beloved Aunt Jimmy, who later dies when he is sixteen.

Boys receive just as much negative feedback from the white community, but they are far more likely to direct their emotions and retaliation outward, inflicting pain on others before the pain turns inward and destroys them.

The rest of The Bluest Eye divides into four separate time sequences, each named for a season of the year and each narrated by Claudia. Crushed by this encounter, Cholly eventually meets and marries Pauline and fathers her children.

African-American girls like Pecola were encouraged to be white. As a character of dark of color Pecola grasps onto the white standard of beauty, thinking that if she had blue eyes like them she would be accepted and loved.

These young men, she is saying, are symbolic of all of the black men who have allowed themselves to be mesmerized by Anglo standards of beauty. Her blackness forces the boys to face their own blackness, and thus they make Pecola the scapegoat for their own ignorance, for their own self-hatred, and for their own feelings of hopelessness.

For example; Maureen Peal as considered as the privileged division of the black society.

As a character of dark color, Pecola grasps onto the white standard of beauty thinking that if she had blue eyes like them she would be accepted and loved. Many critics have approached the novel in the context of the rise of African American writers, assigning significance to their revision of American history with their own cultural materials and folk traditions.

From the day she is born, Pecola is told that she is ugly. Standing midway between the white and black worlds is the exotic Maureen Peal, whose braids are described as "two lynch ropes.In this essay, I will focus on one of Toni Morrison’s novels, The Bluest Eye.

The Bluest Eye is Morrison’s first novel published in ∗. In the novel, Morrison challenges Western standards of beauty and demonstrates that the.

Bluest Eye literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of Bluest Eye. See a complete list of the characters in The Bluest Eye and in-depth analyses of Pecola Breedlove, Claudia MacTeer, Cholly Breedlove, and Pauline Breedlove.

Critical Essay An Overview of The Bluest Eye Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Morrison's story about a young black girl's growing self-hatred begins with an excerpt from a typical first-grade primer from years ago.

- The Importance of the Eye in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, the characters' eyes are everything. The word "eye" appears over and. The Bluest Eye- Essay #1 The concept of beauty is portrayed throughout Morrison’s The Bluest Eye by analyzing the novella’s literary elements such as setting, character, and theme.

Throughout the novella there’s a relation between beauty and the setting, character, and theme that relates to culture and beauty. The setting takes place in the .

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The bluest eye critical essays
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